Wig Review: The Seville Wig by Noriko in Ginger Brown

FYI: I no longer wear wigs except for photoshoots, so I have no information about newer styles than the ones reviewed here. Also, I bought this wig with my own money and no one has paid or requested me to do this review. 

I’ve been curious about this style since it came out in November and finally decided to take the plunge. Since I no longer wear wigs full-time, I try to keep the wigs that I do buy at a reasonable amount; this means I usually have to forgo the monofilament top to keep the cost down. Fortunately a mono top was never a mandatory feature for me, and I can be comfortable in wigs that don’t have one.

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That said, Seville has a lot of permatease even for a non-mono wig (my other recent purchase, Kristen by Jon Renau, doesn’t have a monofilament top or part but it has way less PT than this one – perhaps the lacefront has something to do with that?) so if permatease  isn’t your thing, then Seville probably isn’t your thing either. That said. a lot of people like the shape and lift permatease provides, and this wig has plenty of both. A friend of mine said it reminded them of an updated Laine from the Rene of Paris line, and I can see that. Seville has more of a long bang than Laine had, and not as much PT, but it’s similar in shape and lift to that wig (which I always liked and have owned several of).

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The permatease isn’t quite this bad; I’m using a flash here which accentuates it

If you’re interested in this one, I’d recommend going with a rooted color to hide some of that PT in the parting area. Personally I don’t mind permatease and I love Ginger Brown, so I went with the non-rooted shade  – rooted dark brown wigs never appear to have darker roots than I can see anyway.

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Seville in Ginger Brown, taken with flash again so it’s more shiny here than in reality

The bangs are a bit of an issue on this one; I’ve found this to be an annoyance on a lot of Rene of Paris’s wigs. I suspect it’s due to the thickness of them because even the monofilament tops often have lots of stray wonky hairs hanging down into my face. On a non-mono wig with bangs, it can often be difficult initially to get them to lay in any one direction, and the fiber goes all over the place. But in time I can get them to bend to my will (or with the use of a blowdryer on a low heat setting).  With some playing around I was able to get a nice part into the long bangs, but throughout wearing it stray hairs kept falling into my face. I usually just plucked them out, and with time I think this will settle down.

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As you can see, the cut is pretty and simple, the color is nice, and the hair fiber is true to my past experience with Noriko in that it is exceptionally soft and silky (well, you can’t see that last part, but trust me, it is nice). I like the length, and although the amount of lift in the crown always throws me a little when I put the wig on (my own hair has ZERO lift, so it takes some getting used to) the overall effect is very pretty.

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The cap is very comfortable although Norikos run a touch small – as my bio hair has grown I’ve noticed I need slightly bigger caps now than I used to require, but a Noriko cap still fits my petite/average head nicely. This is a lot of hair, so I wouldn’t call it a good summer wig, but it works just great for January, and when I wore it out I got compliments on  it – mostly the color, which always happens when I wear Ginger Brown. Even while wearing it out running errands the tangling kept to a minimum and it was an easy wig to wear. The only issue is the little stray hairs hanging down into my face, but like I said, I think that will calm down with time.

To get a better idea of what Seville looks like in natural light without that bright flash hitting it, here are a few more shots taken outdoors and without a flash on my camera:

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Overall, I think Seville is a simple and classy style that’s a nice addition to the Noriko line; but that permatease is going to knock it down a notch in my book, because I know a lot of women aren’t going to be able to deal with it. And I sort of feel paying $120 for this wig (which is what I paid at Name Brand Wigs) is a little much for what it is, especially once someone pointed out to me how similar it is to some of the other ROP Hi-Fashion long wigs you can get for around $80. I’m not sure it’s worth $40 more when you could score a Laine or a Misha and give it a trim to perhaps get the same effect. I think the hair fiber is nicer on Norikos than ROPs, but not by much, so perhaps this one is a bit overpriced. For someone who’s lazy like me, though, and would never take in a wig to get it trimmed even if I had the best of intentions to do so, and who likes to try out a new wig here and there when they come in, this one’s a keeper. I’m certainly not disappointed with it at all. So there you go.

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And by the way – when is the entire Rene of Paris company going to get with the program regarding lace fronts and hand-tied caps? Every other major manufacturer has incorporated lots of both options into their lines, but ROP still isn’t offering these options with any regularity. It’s really starting to make the company look stodgy and behind the times, in my opinion. Then again, they were wise enough to steer clear of the whole heat-stylable-synthetic-fiber fiasco so maybe there’s something to be said for resisting trends. But lacefronts and hand-tied caps are safely beyond the trend stage now, so they really could stand to get on that train with the rest of us.

 

6 thoughts on “Wig Review: The Seville Wig by Noriko in Ginger Brown

  1. Pingback: Video Review: Seville by Noriko in Color Banana Split-LR | mareymercy.

    • Great! I haven’t read your post yet but I saw the pic of the Seville when it came across my email – it looks great!! Will read it and comment later – have actually just finished making more reviews 🙂

  2. Pingback: Hair I Go Again!!! | Atypical 60

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